nova-Institute: First generation bioethanol is climate-friendly as second generation bioethanol

Berlaymont, European Commission’s Headquarter in Brussels

A New study conducted by nova-Institute and ordered by CropEnergies, which will be presented and discussed for the first time in Brussels on 26 September 2017, conducts quantitative and qualitative sustainability assessment of biofuels against the background of the EU’s REDII negotiations. This comprehensive sustainability assessment carried out by the German company led by Michael Caurs “shows that first generation bioethanol is as advantageous as second generation bioethanol for a feasible climate strategy”. According the nova-Institute “the results clearly indicate that the systematic discrimination against first generation biofuels of the current Commission proposal is in no way founded on scientific evidence. It would be counterproductive to further lower the share of first generation fuels in the EU’s energy mix”.

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BIO urges U.S. Congress to advance a multi-year extension of renewable energy tax credits

Tom Vilsack and Barack Obama
Tom Vilsack and Barack Obama

The Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO) urges U.S. Congress to advance a multi-year extension of renewable energy tax credits slated to expire at the end of 2016.

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Eni integrates its traditional business and energy from renewable sources

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Eni's plant in Gela, Sicily

Waiting for the new buyer of Versalis, Eni – the Italian oil giant – has made new and important progress in its commitment to combatting climate change, creating an original model of integration between its traditional business and energy from renewable sources.

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Renewable Energy: The path to global sustainability

alaska-airlines-biofuelFor as long as we can remember, oil has been the key source to fueling factories, heavy machinery, vehicles, and airplanes. However these days, investors are looking at renewable energy producers, hoping that they would come up with sustainable solutions that could possibly work as a substitute for oil. With companies perfecting a new technique in making silicon wafers that will reportedly cut future solar power costs by 20 percent, most of those that switched to alternative markets have directed their attention toward solar energy.

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