Travelers flying with SAS can now voluntarily choose to buy biofuel

Travelers flying with SAS can now voluntarily choose to buy biofuel and so help reduce climate-affecting CO2 emissions by up to 80 percent. “The new non-profit service aims to pioneer a large-scale and competitive market for biofuel within aviation, in line with SAS’ sustainability strategy”, stated the Scandinavian airlines company.

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Global Bioenergies, Preem, Sekab and Sveaskog join forces to develop forest-based fuel

Marc Delcourt, co-founder and CEO of Global Bioenergies
Marc Delcourt, co-founder and CEO of Global Bioenergies

Global Bioenergies, Preem, Sekab and Sveaskog yesterday announced having joined forces to develop a high-performance fuel entirely based on forest resources. The consortium has signed a collaboration agreement to carry out a conceptual scope study for a first plant in Sweden. This work will be carried out as part of the “Bio-Based Gasoline Project” with support from the Swedish Energy Agency.

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Klm signs a three-year contract for the supply of biofuel in Los Angeles

klmKLM Royal Dutch Airlines has signed a three-year contract for the supply of sustainable biofuel in Los Angeles. This means that KLM will purchase sustainable biofuel for all its flights at this airport for a period of three years. The biofuel will be produced by the local biofuel refinery AltAir Fuels and supplied by SkyNRG. Los Angeles is the world’s second airport that has incorporated biofuel into its regular refuelling process. The airport in Oslo, Norway, was first to do so in March this year. KLM was also involved in that initiative.

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The South African Airways Group operated Africa’s first sustainable biofuel flights

SAA planeThe South African Airways Group (SAA) last Friday operated Africa’s first sustainable biofuel flights. The flights on Boeing 737-800s between Johannesburg and Cape Town made history as  the first sustainable biofuel flights to have taken place on the African continent. They used home-grown feedstock from the Marble Hall area in the Limpopo region of South Africa as part of Project Solaris, a biofuels project named after the energy tobacco plant used (a technology made in Italy). The nicotine-free, hybridised tobacco plant lends itself to the production of biofuel as the Solaris plant produces small leaves and prodigious flowers and seeds that are crushed to extract a vegetable crude oil. The Solaris plant is ideally suited for this purpose as the remaining seedcake is used as a high protein animal feed supplement that also contributes to food security.

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A U.S. warship took its first delivery of Italian-made biofuel

USS Mason
USS Mason

A U.S. warship took its first delivery of Italian-made biofuel on Thursday as part of the Navy’s program to use more alternative energy. The USS Mason was refueled alongside an Italian vessel, the Andrea Doria, in the seas off of Italy’s southern coast with a mix produced by Italy’s Eni that has 5.5 percent palm oil biofuel blended into marine fuel.

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Hainan Airlines completed China’s first passenger flight with biofuel made from waste cooking oil

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Hainan Airlines

The future is today and our flights are more and more bio-based. A Hainan Airlines Boeing 737-800 completed yesterday China’s first passenger flight with sustainable biofuel made by Sinopec from waste cooking oil collected from restaurants in China.

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Norwegian carried out its first ever flight with biofuel

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Norway's Minister of Climate and Environment, Tine Sundtoft, was among the passengers on board this milestone flight together with Norwegian’s CEO Bjørn Kjos

Last Tuesday, Norwegian – the second largest airline in Scandinavia and the third largest low-cost airline in Europe with approximately 4500 employees – carried out its first ever flight with biofuel. Norwegian’s flight DY631 from Bergen to Oslo took off with almost 50 percent biofuel; a flight that emits over 40 percent less than an average flight with regular fuel.

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Celtic Renewables and Bio Base Pilot Plant together to turn whisky by-products into biofuel

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Bio Base Pilot Plant in Ghent, Belgium

Celtic Renewables, the Edinburgh-based biofuel company, has signed an agreement with Europe’s foremost biotechnology pilot facility to undergo next stage testing of its process to turn whisky by-products into biofuel that can power current vehicles. The partnership, which will allow the company to develop its technology at Bio Base Europe Pilot Plant (BBEPP) in Ghent, has been made possible by second round funding worth €1.5million, including more than €1million from the UK Government, to help meet its ambition of growing a new €125 million-a-year industry in the UK. 

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The UK’s largest biorefinery is officially opened in Hull

Vivergo bioethanol plant in Hull (England)
Vivergo bioethanol plant in Hull (England)

The £350 million Vivergo bioethanol plant in Hull (England) was officially opened this week by Vince Cable, Member of Parliament, Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills. The new plant is the UK’s biggest bioethanol producer and largest single-source supplier of animal feed providing valuable commodities that the UK would usually import.

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Chinese gutter oil as fuel for vehicles in Shanghai

PizzaHutChina.jpgThe municipality of Shanghai in China plans to turn recycled cooking oil, some of it seized by authorities, into an environmental asset by converting it into fuel for vehicles.

The country has been rocked by a series of food safety scandals including the re-use of waste oil recycled from restaurants and called “gutter oil”, a term used in China to describe illicit cooking oil which has been recycled from waste oil collected from sources such as restaurant fryers, drains, grease traps and slaughterhouse waste. Processed gutter oil is expected to be used as bus fuel within two years , as part of efforts to advance a circular economy and prevent recycled cooking oil from returning to the kitchen.

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